From my late teens well into college, I spent five years under the yoke of a Kinko’s apron. There were upsides to the job: supplementing the punk scene I was knee deep in with free zines and flyers, and carte blanche to get stoned on breaks. That job made it possible for me to eke out a living, while focusing energy on stumbling toward adulthood through music and earning party school credits I’m still paying for a decade later. Through copy shop coworkers and happenstance, I stumbled into the early aughts IDM scene. It began with a vague interest in Boards of Canada, and deepened quickly through MP3 CD's with artist names in jagged Sharpie. Still young and intensely involved in a narrow swath of music, I wasn't expecting anything completely outside of punk and hardcore to really hook me. Despite fifteen years of gradually digging way deeper into ambient music, I've maintained a soft spot for that era. Over

the last year or so, a handful of the artists I stumbled across back then reemerged with mostly new material, some for the first time in years. Styrofoam - We Can Never Go Home Styrofoam has been the solo project from producer Arne Van Petegem, kicking around off and on for 20 years. I first crossed paths with I’m What’s There To Show That Something’s Missing, which is as musically on-the-nose as the album title. It was 2003, and painfully earnest was being done well, poorly and attempted constantly. In a sign of the time and place; Styrofoam’s remix of The Postal Service a year earlier was a likely entry point for many. I’m What’s There... fit right in with the indietronica scene of the time, but far from the sickly sweet and cold, glitchy poles. Thankfully, Van Petegem’s vocals were all the right things for this style: relatively sparse, unironic, and more accent than tentpole. As a result, much…